Towards ending sexual assault: Building tools to a safer, better, and stronger society

Topic: Towards ending sexual assault : Building tools to a safer, better, and stronger society
Segment: D Report
Participants: Karla Aguilar, campus advocate and Assistant Director of CARE Program ( Campus Advocacy ,Resource and Education) http://care.ucr.edu/
Broadcast Air Date: 12/15/17 KUCR 88.3 FM.
Time: 5:15 PM (PST)
KUCR station page: http://www.kucr.org
Archive pages: https://soundcloud.com/stoppretending, http://www.dreport.org
Send comments about this segment to: comments@dreport.org

Segment produced in KUCR, the radio station of the University California in Riverside.
Disclaimer: The views expressed are the sole responsibility of the respective speakers and do not represent the endorsed position of the UC Regents, UC Riverside or KUCR.

Discussion points:
– What are the different conversations addressing Sexual assault?
– Is this a pivotal time where people are finding different ways to give voice to what they have experienced?
– How do we change the of stigma away for the survivors and onto the perpetrators of sexual harassment and sexual violence?
– Why do the perpetrators of sexual assault get to hide?
– How do we emphasize the unequal power dynamics in the intervention of sexual assault?
– Isn’t it an awkward contraction, to have the recipients of sexual harassment and sexual violence have to convince everyone that their narrative is true, when the perpetrators get the benefit of the doubt by default?
– What the new ways we talk about consent?
– Is sexual assault an expression of the system of oppression?
– How do all of us hold a little piece of the overall enforcement of oppression?
– What happens if we build more tools, to counter the forces that support sexual violence?
– What are you trying to ruin the party? If your party is about violence, then YES- I will ruin your party.
– How do we acknowledge our numerical power as a tool to build a safer, better stronger society?- “ we are many.”

What the available advocacy resources? http://care.ucr.edu/, http://care.ucr.edu/get-help/index.html

If you’re a survivor of sexual violence, know that what happened to you was not your fault. UCR’s CARE advocates are available if you’d like confidential help in sorting through your emotions, resources and options.

As UCR’s certified sexual assault/domestic violence survivor advocates, CARE advocates operate within an empowerment model of support, aiming to provide those impacted by violence with on- and off-campus resources, and supporting whichever path the survivor feels will be most helpful on their healing journey.

We welcome students, faculty, staff — as well as support individuals — to meet with us in a safe and highly confidential space.
– CARE advocates are here for you, to listen to, support and empower you with the following services:
– For more information of resources for reporting and or support contact
Tel: (951) 827-6225 Email: advocate@ucr.edu

Net Neutrality and Society: Who controls the keys?

Topic: Net Neutrality and Society: Who controls the keys?
Segment: D Report
Participants: Tony K. Yang PhD, economic Historian and host of podcast I’ll Look into it http://illlookintoit.org/
Broadcast Air Date: 12/08/17 KUCR 88.3 FM.
Time: 5:15 PM (PST)
KUCR station page: http://www.kucr.org
Archive pages: https://soundcloud.com/stoppretending, http://www.dreport.org
Send comments about this segment to: comments@dreport.org

Segment produced in KUCR, the radio station of the University California in Riverside.
Disclaimer: The views expressed are the sole responsibility of the respective speakers and do not represent the endorsed position of the UC Regents, UC Riverside or KUCR.

Discussion points:
– What is economic history?
– Is the interment being regulated or deregulated?
– How did the internet become such a vital component of capitalism?
– How did the internet move from being a niche accessed medium to a ubiquitous item in our daily lives?
– Is the internet a disruptive technology?
– Is net neutrality an issue relevant to the first amendment, freedom of speech?
– Is the internet simply the social network site and the video stream location?
– Wasn’t the internet unregulated prior to 2015?
– What is the difference in classifying the Internet Service Providers as “common carriers” instead of “information services?”
– Is net neutrality a subject that addresses the digital divide?
– How has the internet altered our physical lives?
– Have we as a society agreed that the big telecommunication companies will be the gatekeepers of the internet?
– Are ISP’s delivering a product themselves or are ISP’s delivering a type of transportation to a product?
– What if ISP’s decide where you should go to read, listen, watch or buy?
– What’s the big deal about losing net neutrality, if I’m still going to get my information from Fakebook and GlueTube?
– How will you describe the internet you first encountered to your grandchildren?
– Who actually owns the internet?
– Do most people think the internet is like radio stations and or cable channels?
– Can you and I put our own fiber optic cables and have or own servers?
Is the internet a public good, a public utility like the gas and electric company?
– Is there public option to the corporate internet service providers?
– If the internet is so important, why aren’t people really fighting to protect an open and neutral internet?
– When do you think Amazon is going to become its own ISP?
– What kind of human being are you when one corporation dresses you, informs you, entertains you and makes choices for you?
– Do you control all the keys if you control Internet access?

Affirmative Action: from anti-discrimination legal intervention to promotion of diversity

12/01/17 Affirmative Action: from anti-discrimination legal intervention to promotion of diversity
Topic: 12/01/17 Affirmative Action: from anti-discrimination legal intervention to promotion of diversity
Segment: D Report
Participants: Daniel
Broadcast Air Date: 12/01/17 KUCR 88.3 FM.
Time: 5:15 PM (PST)
KUCR station page: http://www.kucr.org
Archive pages: https://soundcloud.com/stoppretending, http://www.dreport.org
Send comments about this segment to: comments@dreport.org

Segment produced in KUCR, the radio station of the University California in Riverside.
Disclaimer: The views expressed are the sole responsibility of the respective speakers and do not represent the endorsed position of the UC Regents, UC Riverside or KUCR.

Discussion points:
Why do we currently understand affirmative action differently from its original intent?
What don’t we understand about affirmative action?
How is Affirmative Action larger than our individual feelings?
Why do we say “you’re so lucky ,” to those that maybe applicable to affirmative action ?
Does it make sense, to say , “you have it easier because you “ not- white” and “ under represented?”
Wasn’t Affirmative Action policy a legal intervention to undo the legal construction of racial inequality?
How did Affirmative Action become about diversity?
Was the 1865 The Freedmen’s Bureau a form of Affirmative Action?
Is it charity for the government that legally supported slavery to consequently support the recently freed slaves toward some form of equality?
When does the phrase “affirmative action” enter popular speech?
Doesn’t the government have a responsibility to counter the legal construction of racial inequality?
How do you prove that you are not discriminating when you have a 100% white male employee pool?
Why did Proposition 209 in 1997 officially take a position against affirmative action?
How does the Bakke case of 1978 change the conversation about affirmative action from legal intervention toward racial equity into inclusion through diversity?
Grutter v Bollinger in 2003, re-affirms the permits of diversity models of affirmative action’s policies.
Why are the courts so hesitant to use the law to counter racial inequality when racial inequality was legally created?
Why is the conversation regarding the fairness of Affirmative Action policies a loosing discussion?

Mario Luna Romero visita UCR, habla de Congreso Nacional Indigena Y MariChuy para presediente 2018

11/ 24/17 Mario Luna Romero habla de Congreso Nacional Indigena Y MariChuy para presediente 2018
Topic: Mario Luna Romero habla de Congreso Nacional Indigena Y MariChuy para presediente 2018
Segment: D Report
Participants: Mario Luna Romero, Congreso Nacional Indigena
Broadcast Air Date: 11/24/17 KUCR 88.3 FM.
Time: 5:15 PM (PST)
KUCR station page: http://www.kucr.org
Archive pages: https://soundcloud.com/stoppretending, http://www.dreport.org
Send comments about this segment to: comments@dreport.org

Segment produced in KUCR, the radio station of the University California in Riverside.
Disclaimer: The views expressed are the sole responsibility of the respective speakers and do not represent the endorsed position of the UC Regents, UC Riverside or KUCR.

Discussion points:

Why were you jailed for a year and yet released without any changes?
What are the political and economic pressures that force us to become ” Lawyers?”
How do you convert ancestry into resources to be shared as if they were merchandise?
What are the tools and mechanisms to protect our natural resources?
How do we build new spaces where we can share our hopes, dreams and even pain?
What is the national indigenous congress?
How do you build a nation congress that is absent of bureaucratic weight?
How does the indigenous congress of governance offer new alternative tools for respecting the rights of people?
Are the established political parties already dividing up the counter’s resources as part of the expected normal?
The national indigenous congress community is unafraid of agreements. disagreement are part of the community?
Why is there a divide between what the people want and need, and what has been offered by the politicians?
Why did the Mexican Government reroute the river while ignoring the rights of Yaqui the community?
Don’t the Yaqui people have more rights to the river, if the Yaqui people were there before the creation of the Mexican state?
What are the different visions of what freedom means?
Doesn’t the entire world want the same things- safety for one’s self, family, friends and community?
Why do the politicians and corporations keep the full truth away from the people?
What if another world is possible?
What response do you get, when you state, “ I was here before you?”
When you take actions without thinking of others, you generate division.
Why does the indigenous cosmo-vision clash with capitalism and neoliberalism?
The indigenous communities (without asking for permission) have been building alternative forms of resource management?
Does capitalism have a nation?
The world is now divided by countries, but it was not always divided and does have to stay like that?
Why do the politicians feel that they own our national destiny and resources?
The people are hurt and angered by all the failures of the nation-state?
How did the decision to present an indigenous woman presidential candidate occur?
Why do they say we are being contradictory, when the fight to protect your own life cannot be contradictory?
How is the national indigenous congress as a presidential candidate different from other candidate parties that also promise change?
What happens when the people refuse to accept how they are being treated by the state, as an acceptable normal?
How was presidential candidate Marichuy was chosen by the National Indigenous Congress to be voice of the people?
What is the proposal to organize the people from the bottom, from the base?
How is this movement is bigger than Mexico, bigger than riverside?

20 years of masculinity

11/ 17 /17 20 years of masculinity
Topic: 20 years of masculinity
Segment: D Report
Participants: Hector Torres Cacho MA in Urban Planning
Broadcast Air Date: 11/ 17/17 KUCR 88.3 FM.
Time: 5:15 PM (PST)
KUCR station page: http://www.kucr.org
Archive pages: https://soundcloud.com/stoppretending, http://www.dreport.org
Send comments about this segment to: comments@dreport.org

Segment produced in KUCR, the radio station of the University California in Riverside.
Disclaimer: The views expressed are the sole responsibility of the respective speakers and do not represent the endorsed position of the UC Regents, UC Riverside or KUCR.

Discussion points:
What does masculinity mean to you?
What are the public and private expressions of masculinity?
Is masculinity fluid and constantly morphing?
How is masculinity something that is ascribed to our bodies, to our gendered bodies?
Did we believe the scripts of masculinity?
What does it mean to be a man in 2017 versus 1997?
How do you make sense as Chicanos and Native people trying to fit in this world?
What are some of the rites of passage for men?
Who is Jimmy Santiago Baca?
What happens to those of us that are not satisfied accepting the script of masculinity?
Do men feel detached from our gendered bodies?
What does it mean if your braid falls forward over your shoulder instead of straight down your back?
Do we regulate masculinity through violence?
Walking Around – Poem by Pablo Neruda:
It so happens I am sick of being a man.
And it happens that I walk into tailor shops and movie…
The smell of barbershops makes me break into hoarse
sobs.
Are master status categories, costumes that we wear just to fit in?
What happens with you reject the conflicting messages of the scripted categories?
Can you do folklorico dancing as still be masculine?
How does forced assimilation being American include getting jumped?
Do we compromise a sense of our true selves by keeping the divide between our public and private presentations?
What if masculinity has nothing that you want to emulate?
If masculinity is an expression of power, what happens to those of us that do not grow up with power?
Can you feel free in the rejection of masculinity?
How do we support the next generation of men to have new opportunities of expressions?
How do fathers teach us new forms of masculinity?
Where do our mothers fit in our understanding of masculinity?

Three conversations on Masculinity

11/ 10 /17 Three conversations on Masculinity
Topic: Three conversations on Masculinity
Segment: D Report
Participants: Salvador Boites MA, Mike Chavez Ph.D. Sociology, and Hector Torres Cacho MA
Broadcast Air Date: 11/ 10/17 KUCR 88.3 FM.
Time: 5:15 PM (PST)
KUCR station page: http://www.kucr.org
Archive pages: https://soundcloud.com/stoppretending, http://www.dreport.org
Send comments about this segment to: comments@dreport.org

Segment produced in KUCR, the radio station of the University California in Riverside.

Disclaimer: The views expressed are the sole responsibility of the respective speakers and do not represent the endorsed position of the UC Regents, UC Riverside or KUCR.

Discussion points:
What does masculinity mean to you?

Standing in front of the class: From student to teacher

11/ 03 /17 standing in front of the class: from student to teacher
Topic: Standing in front of the class: from student to teacher
Segment: D Report
Participants: Alma Guadalupe Lopez, Assistant Professor of English at San Bernardino Valley College, Co-Coordinator of Puente Project, and UCR Alumni
Broadcast Air Date: 11/ 03/17 KUCR 88.3 FM.
Time: 5:15 PM (PST)
KUCR station page: http://www.kucr.org
Archive pages: https://soundcloud.com/stoppretending, http://www.dreport.org
Send comments about this segment to: comments@dreport.org

Segment produced in KUCR, the radio station of the University California in Riverside.
Disclaimer: The views expressed are the sole responsibility of the respective speakers and do not represent the endorsed position of the UC Regents, UC Riverside or KUCR.

Discussion points:
How did we become educators?
what made you think, “Hey I want to go to college?”
Why is track A, the college track?
How did the Puente project offer new direction toward navigating college?
How did seeing shades of yourself in the literature allow you to see yourself as part of college?
How do get the different tools for navigating college?
Did you know you wanted to teach in College?
Did you know you wanted to go to graduate school?
Where did you find a sense of community while away in college?
How did Chicana Student Programs and Raza Graduate Student Association allow us to make it through graduate school?
Why do some of us feel strong in graduate school while some of us feel strong as undergraduates?
How does seeing the built patterns of the graduate program offer strength?
Can we see that the program, curriculum, students and educator has flaws?
How does graduate school admittance offer a false measure of competence to succeed in graduate school?
What are the expected roles of graduate school?
Is the stereotype of the “brown body” also in graduate school?
What are those experiences that you put on the shelf and move forward?
What if your graduate program “destroys your life?”
How do you make it through school, when you know what you want to do and you know who are the students you need to help?
What changes when you move to the front of the class from being the student?
How do we remember “them” as students; they were our peers?
The students we see are familiar; they are the same students, just different time.
How do we offer respect to our students?
Do educators also have a safe space to build community?
Do students think about the teachers?
Do educators feel safe in the class?
How do the educators stay healthy?
How do educators plant seeds?
What happens with the student- teacher relationships if students move on with their respective education career?
Can you go back and check in with your past teacher if don’t have post school degree?