The Poor People’s Campaign- Engaging in a political, economic and social dialogue for solutions to poverty

09/14/18 The Poor People’s Campaign- Engaging in a political, economic and social dialogue about solutions to poverty
Topic: Poor People’s Campaign, Poverty, Racism, Capitalism, Ecological Devastation, War economy , Distorted Moral Narrative
Segment: D Report
Participants: Kenia Alcocer, Co-Chair of California Poor People’s Campaign
Broadcast Air Date: 09/14/18
Time: 5:15 PM (PST)
Station: KUCR 88.3 FM Riverside, CA
KUCR station page: http://www.kucr.org
Archive pages: https://soundcloud.com/stoppretending, http://www.dreport.org
Send comments about this segment to: comments@dreport.org

Segment produced in KUCR, the radio station of the University California in Riverside.

Disclaimer: The views expressed are the sole responsibility of the respective speakers and do not represent the endorsed position of the UC Regents, UC Riverside or KUCR.

Discussion Topics:
-What is the Poor People’s Campaign- A National Call for Moral Revival?
– What is  anti-displacement and anti-discrimination work?
– How do we push the local government to support the local community with the things necessary to thrive?
– What is the connection between present Poor People’s campaign and the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr’s Poor People’s campaign from 1968?
– The 1968 Poor People’s campaign identified three pillars of evil: 1- poverty, 2- racism and 3- the war economy
-The 2018 Poor People’s Campaign adds ecological devastation and distorted moral narrative.
– The Souls of Poor Folk audithttps://www.poorpeoplescampaign.org/audit/
– How does the narrative about poverty and the poor become purposefully distorted?
-How do we fight poverty and not the poor?
– Can we analyze poverty?
– Is poverty a structurally outlined product of capitalism?
– Forty states have signed up along with California’s Poor People’s Campaign.
– How is poverty hidden from our daily lives?
– How is poverty created?
-How does the poor people’s campaign become a movement that involves white folk as much and black and brown communities?
– How do we have an in-depth talk about poverty in our communities?
– What of the different ways of defining poverty?
– How and why is poverty sustainable?
– How and why is poverty and reproducible?
– Poverty requires the support of the nation- state for it to exist.
– How can we engage in political, economic and social dialogue about solutions to poverty?
– How and why do we support the system of poverty by hiding our own economic, political, social and physical vulnerabilities?
– This is my campaign not because I want to help the poor, but is my campaign because I am the poor.
-Is the ultimate goal of the Poor People’s Campaign for none of us to be hurting?
– Is the Poor People’s Campaign and international movement?
– There will be a mass meeting of the Poor People’s Campaign on Sunday, September 23, 2018
– Are 140 million people living in poverty across the United States?

SB 10 Ends Cash Bail on October 2019

Topic: Senate Bill 10, California Ends Cash Bail
Segment: D Report
Participants: Sam Sueoka
Broadcast Air Date: 09/07/18
Time: 5:15 PM (PST)
Station: KUCR 88.3 FM Riverside, CA
KUCR station page: http://www.kucr.org
Archive pages: https://soundcloud.com/stoppretending, http://www.dreport.org
Send comments about this segment to: comments@dreport.org

Segment produced in KUCR, the radio station of the University California in Riverside.

Disclaimer: The views expressed are the sole responsibility of the respective speakers and do not represent the endorsed position of the UC Regents, UC Riverside or KUCR.

Discussion Topics:
– What is the Cash Bail system?
– How does SB 10 end the cash bail system?
– What is the effect of the cash bail system on our communities?
– When will SB 10 take effect? October 2019
– Is the cash bail system unconstitutional?
– How does the cash bail system disproportionally affect low income people and communities of color?
– Is being detained in jail because of an inability to pay the bail fees, an infringement of due process?
-How does the cash bail system favor people that have more money and punish the poor?
– What system will replace the cash bail system?
– Will the use of a pretrial determination lead to more detentions?
– What algorithms will be used to assess whether a person should be released or maintained in custody?
– Why did the ACLU and Human Watch pull out their support for the bill SB 10 when they are original co-sponsors of the bill?
– How do we address institutional racism within the judicial system?
– Why is the moment of judicial reform more comfortable addressing economics and not racism?
– Why does SB10 continue to place communities of color at risk of being over incarcerated?
-Can we talk about the nation-wide pattern of over policing, over sentencing and detention of members of our communities all over the United States?
– How do we change a judicial system that operates under a fear of people of color?
– What are the details of the validated risk assessment tools?
– Can SB10 become another tool for mass incarceration?
– What are the costs of having a judicial system that over incarnates people?
-What is the history of the judicial system in the manufacture and maintenance of race in order to benefit a few at the expense of the many?

Nationwide Prison Strike 2018: A demand to hold society accountable

Topic: Nation-wide Prison Strike, Prison Industrial Complex, End Prison Wage Slavery
Segment: D Report
Participants: David Chavez,  M.A.,  ABD History  Dept.  UC Riverside
Broadcast Air Date: 09/01/18
Time: 5:15 PM (PST)
Station: KUCR 88.3 FM Riverside, CA
KUCR station page: http://www.kucr.org
Archive pages: https://soundcloud.com/stoppretending, http://www.dreport.org
Send comments about this segment to: comments@dreport.org
Segment produced in KUCR, the radio station of the University California in Riverside.
Disclaimer: The views expressed are the sole responsibility of the respective speakers and do not represent the endorsed position of the UC Regents, UC Riverside or KUCR.
Discussion Topics:
– What are the demands of the nation-wide prison strike that began on August 21, 2018.
The 2018 National Prison Strike: A Movement Making its Mark
– What is the history of prison strikes?
– How and why have we over-normalized prisons, jails and policing?
– How can focusing on language offer us alternative perspectives to evaluate prisons and society?
– How did the incidents of violence at the Lee correctional institution in South Carolina lead to the present prison strike across the country?
– How do we shift the conversation towards considering the act of imprisonment as  an act of violence?
– What is the history of penitentiaries/prisons?
-Did the Quakers build the first jail house in the United States?
– Is imprisonment a form of torture?
– Is the torture of people within prisons part of the fabric of the United States?
– How do we hold society accountable to the shifts in arbitrary rules that it establishes to enforce punishment?
– How do we emphasize the humanity of the people detained in prisons?
– Why is referring to people as felons, convicts and or prisoners a form of de-humanization?
-How does the over sentencing and overcrowding aggravate the conditions for people within prisons?
– How does the creation of new crimes add to the number of people in prisons?
– What is required in order to shut down prisons?
– How do we transform the judicial system from punitive justice to transformative justice?
– Do we live in a society of containment? We move from one box to another throughout our days.
– How do the people outside of prisons become accountable for the permitted violence inside of the prisons?
– Is the operation of the prison industrial complex a form slavery?
– What are the contradictions in the 13th amendment of the U.S. constitution that permits slavery as punishment for a crime
–  what is prison wage labor?
– How do we make sense of the warehousing of people in prisons?
-What is the harm to families, health and economics in removing people from their respective communities to be place in prisons?
-What is prison abolition?

Left Coast Forum: Opening spaces for dialogue

Topic: Left Coast Forum, community building. Race as social construct, activism
Segment: D Report
Participants: Sharon Kyle, Co-Editor and Publisher, LA Progressive
Broadcast Air Date: 08/24/18
Time: 5:15 PM (PST)
Station: KUCR 88.3 FM Riverside, CA
KUCR station page: http://www.kucr.org
Archive pages: https://soundcloud.com/stoppretending, http://www.dreport.org

Send comments about this segment to: comments@dreport.org

Segment produced in KUCR, the radio station of the University California in Riverside.

Disclaimer: The views expressed are the sole responsibility of the respective speakers and do not represent the endorsed position of the UC Regents, UC Riverside or KUCR.

Discussion Topics:
-What is the Left Coast Forum 2018?
– Were there any surprises from the first Left coast forum in 2017?
-How do we open up spaces of dialogue to be inclusive of everyone?
– What kinds of conversations are shared in the Left Coast Forum?
– Do we need to go to the Ivy League schools to learn about the capitalist system?
-Is the Left Forum in New York different from the Left Coast Forum in Los Angeles?
– Is academic discourse also available outside of Colleges and Universities?
– How do we assess the importance of public space for a healthy society?
– Can we re-appropriate the public space via access of community college settings?
– Where can we openly congregate to have conversations about the important subjects affecting our lives?
– Have you read, City of Inmates: Conquest, Rebellion, and the Rise of Human Caging in Los Angeles, by Kelly Lytle Hernández?
– How is the subject of race central to understanding the Left Coast Forum?
– Is the progressive movement ready to address race critically?
– What is the history of race as a social invention?
– How did bacon’s rebellion lead to the creation of whiteness and non-whiteness?
– How do we overcome the taboo against talking about race?
– Have you read the book ,The Invention of the White Race by Theodore W. Allen?
– How do we become liberated from the racial construct?

Cinema Culturas-Time tell our own stories

08/10/18 Cinema Culturas- Time tell our own stories

Topic: Film,  Culture, Community, Film Festival, Coachella Valley,
Segment: D Report
Participants: Cony Martinez, PhD, General Director Cinema Culturas Foundation
Broadcast Air Date: 08/10/18
Time: 5:15 PM (PST)
Station: KUCR 88.3 FM Riverside, CA
KUCR station page: http://www.kucr.org
Archive pages: https://soundcloud.com/stoppretending, http://www.dreport.org

Send comments about this segment to: comments@dreport.org

Segment produced in KUCR, the radio station of the University California in Riverside.
Disclaimer: The views expressed are the sole responsibility of the respective speakers and do not represent the endorsed position of the UC Regents, UC Riverside or KUCR.

Discussion Topics:
-How do we recognize the power of film?
-Why is it important to make film accessible to the community?
– What is Cinema Culturas?
– How does the community connect and become impacted by the film festival?
-Does everyone in Los Angeles want to be an actor, director or movie producer?
– Does film also express the hierarchy of society?
-Instead of talking about the other, can film allow people to talk for themselves?
– Is your heart in the right place in order to you make things accessible?
-The heart of the film festival is about the stories being told.
-What is the “ other” Coachella?
-How do we exercise the act of being inclusive?
– Why is it important to screen the films in accessibility to the producing community?
-What stories are you filming and where are these stories taking place is just as important as why you decided to film?
-Is the festival in the fields about highlighting our home?
– How do we honor the people that tell their stories?
-What is the difference between sharing someone’s stories and appropriating someone’s stories?
– Do we have ownership of our own stories?
– How do we trust that the inclusive practice is expected to be difficult?
– Can we distinguish the authentic commitment to be inclusive from in-authentic inclusivity?
-How do we embrace language as a barrier to create opportunities to open more doors?
– Is it fair to consider film as a medium that is exclusive and difficult to get into?
-What is the difference between the film industry and the use of film to tell stories a create community?
– Our stories do not have to be told by Hollywood; It is time for us to tell our own stories.
– How do we portray our communities as creative people?
– How do we address the issues of representation as the divide between the stereotypes and the realities that we own?
– How do we take ownership the great creativity available in our homes ?
– Why is it more important to get the story right than getting the filming aspect right?

Meet me at “the Cheech”- Center for Chicano Art Culture and Industry

Title: Meet me at “the Cheech”- Center for Chicano Art Culture and Industry
Topics: The Cheech, Cheech Marin Center for Chicano Art, community health, Art, Riverside
Segment: D Report
Participants: Ninfa Delgado lead member of “ UNIDOS” and Ofelia Valdez Yeager, Campaign Chair for “ the Cheech”
Broadcast Air Date: 06/29/18
Time: 5:15 PM (PST)
Station: KUCR 88.3 FM Riverside, CA
KUCR station page: http://www.kucr.org
Archive pages: https://soundcloud.com/stoppretending, http://www.dreport.org

Send comments about this segment to: comments@dreport.org

Segment produced in KUCR, the radio station of the University California in Riverside.
Disclaimer: The views expressed are the sole responsibility of the respective speakers and do not represent the endorsed position of the UC Regents, UC Riverside or KUCR.

Discussion Topics:
– What is the back story of the idea for the Chicano art museum, “ The Cheech?”
– How did the Riverside Art Museum reach out to the diverse communities of the city?
– How did the main public library building become a venue for Chicano art?
– How will the “the Cheech” museum become more than an art center?
– How do we acknowledge Chicano art as American art?
– How did Latino Network 25th anniversary celebration redirect its efforts to support “The Cheech?”
– What are the different roles that the divers community organizations play in the advancement of the people?
– What is the role of art in the health of communities?
– How do we represent our history through art?
– Are low rider cars a form of art?
– How does art transform communities?
– What are the different histories and stories within Riverside?
– Art is a language that is already in the community?
– Are we meeting at “the Cheech?”

Pomona Economic Opportunity Center: Respect and support of street vendors

06/22/18 Pomona Economic Opportunity Center: Respect and support of street vendors

Topic: Pomona Economic Opportunity Center, Day labor, Legalize Street venders
Segment: D Report
Participants: Benjamin  Wood , Organizer  with  Pomona Economic Opportunity Center
Broadcast Air Date: 06/22/18
Time: 5:15 PM (PST)
Station: KUCR 88.3 FM Riverside, CA
KUCR station page: http://www.kucr.org
Archive pages: https://soundcloud.com/stoppretending, http://www.dreport.org

Send comments about this segment to: comments@dreport.org

Segment produced in KUCR, the radio station of the University California in Riverside.

Disclaimer: The views expressed are the sole responsibility of the respective speakers and do not represent the endorsed position of the UC Regents, UC Riverside or KUCR.

Discussion Topics:
– How did the movement to defend day Laborers lead to founding the Pomona Economic Opportunity Center ?
– How can day laborers counter the vulnerability to racist attacks?
– What is the relationship between the 1994 NAFTA implementation and entre of day labor into Pomona?
– What are the services of the Pomona Economic Opportunity center available to workers?
– How does a central infrastructure space help create a sense of safety for vulnerable communities?
– If cities and towns are aware of how integral day labor is to the local economies, why do most refuse to support the workers?
– What is the deference between at-large representation and by- district representation?
– Was Pomona one of the first cities where MALDEF used the California voting right Act to break up the city into districts?
– What are the similarities between Street Vendors and Day Laborers?
– How does the visibility of street vending make street venders vulnerable?
– How city ordinances create rules that criminalize street vending?
– Ricardo Lara introduced SB946 to legalize street vending in California.
– Why is it that that most cities want to benefit from street venders but also want to criminalize street vending?
– Do most people in Pomona support legalizing street vending?
– What is the historic Mexican barrio in Rancho Cucamonga?
– Is the resistance to legalize street vending motivated by racism and classism?
– If street venders are small business owners , then why won’t cities support them?