Los Angeles Water School: Art ,Tongva educators and Critical Thought- October 12, 2018

10/05/18 Los Angeles Water School: Art ,Tongva educators and Critical Thought- October 12, 2018

Topic: Los Angeles, Indigenous Peoples Day, LAWs, Tongva
Segment: D Report
Participants: Panda and Luis Tauzon, LAWS- Los Angeles Water School
Broadcast Air Date: 10/05/18
Time: 5:15 PM (PST)
Station: KUCR 88.3 FM Riverside, CA
KUCR station page: http://www.kucr.org
Archive pages: https://soundcloud.com/stoppretending, http://www.dreport.org
Send comments about this segment to: comments@dreport.org
Segment produced in KUCR, the radio station of the University California in Riverside.
Disclaimer: The views expressed are the sole responsibility of the respective speakers and do not represent the endorsed position of the UC Regents, UC Riverside or KUCR.

Event:
LAWS, Los Angeles Water School.
October 12, 2018
7 to 9 pm
Downtown LA
311 south Anderson street, Los Angeles CA
Discussion Topics:
– Who were the original people of the area presently named as Los Angeles?
-The Tongva people lived by LA river.
-How do we become students of the water?
– Is October 8 Indigenous peoples’ Day on in Los Angeles?
-How do we reframe and dismantle systems that are not productive and replace them with new an creative infrastructures?
– What is Los Angeles Water School?
– What happens when art and critical thought come together?
-What happens when true dialogue and education create new ideas?
-How do we acknowledge the river that runs through the metropolis of Los Angeles?
-Why did they encase the free LA river in concrete?
– How do we uncover the history of LA river?
-Where does the city of Los Angles get its water?
-Do people know that much of LA city’s water comes from Paiute land in the Owens Valley?
-How does water connect us all through huge geographic distances?
– Is the city a dependent infrastructure because most people don’t have of way feeding themselves?
– How do we study the city within a perspective of a landscape requiring a lot of inequality?
-When did people start living in cities?
– What is our responsibility as indigenous people to the past, present and future generations?
– What is the role of art in creating conversation and new ideas?
– What is the original name of the area that Los Angeles is built on top of?
– How will the people of Los Angeles continue to exist within the fragile ecosystem dependent of water?
-The Tongva people will speak about the history the Los Angeles landscape.
-Why are most people in Los Angeles ignorant of the original people of area presently known as Los Angeles?
-Why is language one of the first things colonizer take away from indigenous people?
– LAWS is hosting an event October 12, 2018 7 to 9 pm at 311 south Anderson street, Los Angeles CA
– Grandma Gloria and Grandma Julia will speak at the event on October 12, 2018.
– Indigenous people all over the work are in the forefront fighting capitalism, racism and environmental exploitation.
-Why does the United States have a narrative that the Native people were destroyed?
– How do we reclaim a story of ourselves?
– A lot can be rebuilt from a little.
– A single word can hold a library of information.
-How do we recognize the indigenous expressions manifested in our daily lives?
-How do our everyday meals show resistance to colonial impositions.
– How are the issues in Flint Michigan and Standing Rock related?
-How do we return to our home communities in order to listen and learn from our elders?
-Indigenous people have the answers to present economic, political and environment pressures affecting their respective  indigenous communities.
– Why are we accustomed to a society that sequesters knowledge?
– We will no longer accept the narrative that our indigenous communities are void of information.
– How do we recognize that indigenous people are holders of intelligence?
– Let’s recognize that nature is one of the most intelligent systems ever.
– How does art help a people uplift themselves?
– How do we bring awareness to Indigenous People day?

Schooling Out of Fear

09/21/18 Schooling out of fear
Topic:  Education ,Schools, Critical education, Community
Segment: D Report
Participants: Lydia Martinez , Artist, Mother, Counselor, Content and Program Developer
Broadcast Air Date: 09/21/18
Time: 5:15 PM (PST)
Station: KUCR 88.3 FM Riverside, CA
KUCR station page: http://www.kucr.org
Archive pages: https://soundcloud.com/stoppretending, http://www.dreport.org
Send comments about this segment to: comments@dreport.org

Segment produced in KUCR, the radio station of the University California in Riverside.

Disclaimer: The views expressed are the sole responsibility of the respective speakers and do not represent the endorsed position of the UC Regents, UC Riverside or KUCR.

Discussion Topics:
– What is a critical analysis of education and schools?
-How do you connect the academic preparation of studying schools to the personal of position parenting?
– Why does the summer feel free from competitions for our children’s time and attention?
– Does the fall school re-entry activate the return of worry for both children and parents?
– What are gentrification refugees?
– Bay area gentrification as economic displacement has led many to move out  of California?
– What is the red for ed movement?
– What are the different school environments available for our children?
– Is this generation of parents over worrying?
– Is school really that bad?
– Is school producing generations of over pressured children?
– Good work ethic does not mean you negate your boundaries?
– Are we pretending to have “family time?”
– Why do we have to pass laws to protect workers from being fired for not checking a work email at home?
– We must be intentional about the places our children enter, who they are learning from and what content they are learning.
– What kind of adults are the schools producing?
– Are corporation selling people to the highest bidder?
– Can we take step back and ask, why are we sending our children to the same schools?
– What is the history of the public-school system?
– Why do we keep asking the same questions?
– Why does every new generation of education academic repeat the same studies, and yet the schools stay the same?
– If the solution was based on information, then we would have solved the many schooling problems already.
– The community has answers to the education problems.
– What is wrong with our schools? – Nothing, schools are operating exactly how they were designed.
– Are parents in competition with schools that  are over instructing our children?
– How do we shame the parents that cannot afford to support the expectations of the pressured school system?
-Can we assess the quality of time versus the quantity of time spent at school?
– Are we experiencing a pattern of  schooling out of fear?
– Some parents don’t rely on schools because they can supply the future that their children want, and other parents must rely on the school to supply the future the that children want to achieve.
– Schooling out of fear means you never have enough time for all the content you want to transmit to the students.
– Can we move away from giving homework?
-How do we tell the school that we rather spend our evenings with our children in quality time, instead of doing homework?
– Can we teach our children to advocate for themselves in school?
– What are the stories we carry about schools?
– How do we inform the school that parents also have education in their homes to share with their children?
– How do we as community members play larger and more respected roles as educators of our children in relation to schools?
– Does your school let you do your work on the floor if you can’t stay still in the chair and desk?
– What is the difference in between looking as different schools versus looking at an entire education system?
-Children learn in all of their environments.
– What is the community the child belongs too?
– Is your school an ally to your child’s community?
– What is restorative justice?
-How do you base a school on a restorative justice model ?

The Poor People’s Campaign- Engaging in a political, economic and social dialogue for solutions to poverty

09/14/18 The Poor People’s Campaign- Engaging in a political, economic and social dialogue about solutions to poverty
Topic: Poor People’s Campaign, Poverty, Racism, Capitalism, Ecological Devastation, War economy , Distorted Moral Narrative
Segment: D Report
Participants: Kenia Alcocer, Co-Chair of California Poor People’s Campaign
Broadcast Air Date: 09/14/18
Time: 5:15 PM (PST)
Station: KUCR 88.3 FM Riverside, CA
KUCR station page: http://www.kucr.org
Archive pages: https://soundcloud.com/stoppretending, http://www.dreport.org
Send comments about this segment to: comments@dreport.org

Segment produced in KUCR, the radio station of the University California in Riverside.

Disclaimer: The views expressed are the sole responsibility of the respective speakers and do not represent the endorsed position of the UC Regents, UC Riverside or KUCR.

Discussion Topics:
-What is the Poor People’s Campaign- A National Call for Moral Revival?
– What is  anti-displacement and anti-discrimination work?
– How do we push the local government to support the local community with the things necessary to thrive?
– What is the connection between present Poor People’s campaign and the Reverend Dr. Martin Luther King Jr’s Poor People’s campaign from 1968?
– The 1968 Poor People’s campaign identified three pillars of evil: 1- poverty, 2- racism and 3- the war economy
-The 2018 Poor People’s Campaign adds ecological devastation and distorted moral narrative.
– The Souls of Poor Folk audithttps://www.poorpeoplescampaign.org/audit/
– How does the narrative about poverty and the poor become purposefully distorted?
-How do we fight poverty and not the poor?
– Can we analyze poverty?
– Is poverty a structurally outlined product of capitalism?
– Forty states have signed up along with California’s Poor People’s Campaign.
– How is poverty hidden from our daily lives?
– How is poverty created?
-How does the poor people’s campaign become a movement that involves white folk as much and black and brown communities?
– How do we have an in-depth talk about poverty in our communities?
– What of the different ways of defining poverty?
– How and why is poverty sustainable?
– How and why is poverty and reproducible?
– Poverty requires the support of the nation- state for it to exist.
– How can we engage in political, economic and social dialogue about solutions to poverty?
– How and why do we support the system of poverty by hiding our own economic, political, social and physical vulnerabilities?
– This is my campaign not because I want to help the poor, but is my campaign because I am the poor.
-Is the ultimate goal of the Poor People’s Campaign for none of us to be hurting?
– Is the Poor People’s Campaign and international movement?
– There will be a mass meeting of the Poor People’s Campaign on Sunday, September 23, 2018
– Are 140 million people living in poverty across the United States?

SB 10 Ends Cash Bail on October 2019

Topic: Senate Bill 10, California Ends Cash Bail
Segment: D Report
Participants: Sam Sueoka
Broadcast Air Date: 09/07/18
Time: 5:15 PM (PST)
Station: KUCR 88.3 FM Riverside, CA
KUCR station page: http://www.kucr.org
Archive pages: https://soundcloud.com/stoppretending, http://www.dreport.org
Send comments about this segment to: comments@dreport.org

Segment produced in KUCR, the radio station of the University California in Riverside.

Disclaimer: The views expressed are the sole responsibility of the respective speakers and do not represent the endorsed position of the UC Regents, UC Riverside or KUCR.

Discussion Topics:
– What is the Cash Bail system?
– How does SB 10 end the cash bail system?
– What is the effect of the cash bail system on our communities?
– When will SB 10 take effect? October 2019
– Is the cash bail system unconstitutional?
– How does the cash bail system disproportionally affect low income people and communities of color?
– Is being detained in jail because of an inability to pay the bail fees, an infringement of due process?
-How does the cash bail system favor people that have more money and punish the poor?
– What system will replace the cash bail system?
– Will the use of a pretrial determination lead to more detentions?
– What algorithms will be used to assess whether a person should be released or maintained in custody?
– Why did the ACLU and Human Watch pull out their support for the bill SB 10 when they are original co-sponsors of the bill?
– How do we address institutional racism within the judicial system?
– Why is the moment of judicial reform more comfortable addressing economics and not racism?
– Why does SB10 continue to place communities of color at risk of being over incarcerated?
-Can we talk about the nation-wide pattern of over policing, over sentencing and detention of members of our communities all over the United States?
– How do we change a judicial system that operates under a fear of people of color?
– What are the details of the validated risk assessment tools?
– Can SB10 become another tool for mass incarceration?
– What are the costs of having a judicial system that over incarnates people?
-What is the history of the judicial system in the manufacture and maintenance of race in order to benefit a few at the expense of the many?

Nationwide Prison Strike 2018: A demand to hold society accountable

Topic: Nation-wide Prison Strike, Prison Industrial Complex, End Prison Wage Slavery
Segment: D Report
Participants: David Chavez,  M.A.,  ABD History  Dept.  UC Riverside
Broadcast Air Date: 09/01/18
Time: 5:15 PM (PST)
Station: KUCR 88.3 FM Riverside, CA
KUCR station page: http://www.kucr.org
Archive pages: https://soundcloud.com/stoppretending, http://www.dreport.org
Send comments about this segment to: comments@dreport.org
Segment produced in KUCR, the radio station of the University California in Riverside.
Disclaimer: The views expressed are the sole responsibility of the respective speakers and do not represent the endorsed position of the UC Regents, UC Riverside or KUCR.
Discussion Topics:
– What are the demands of the nation-wide prison strike that began on August 21, 2018.
The 2018 National Prison Strike: A Movement Making its Mark
– What is the history of prison strikes?
– How and why have we over-normalized prisons, jails and policing?
– How can focusing on language offer us alternative perspectives to evaluate prisons and society?
– How did the incidents of violence at the Lee correctional institution in South Carolina lead to the present prison strike across the country?
– How do we shift the conversation towards considering the act of imprisonment as  an act of violence?
– What is the history of penitentiaries/prisons?
-Did the Quakers build the first jail house in the United States?
– Is imprisonment a form of torture?
– Is the torture of people within prisons part of the fabric of the United States?
– How do we hold society accountable to the shifts in arbitrary rules that it establishes to enforce punishment?
– How do we emphasize the humanity of the people detained in prisons?
– Why is referring to people as felons, convicts and or prisoners a form of de-humanization?
-How does the over sentencing and overcrowding aggravate the conditions for people within prisons?
– How does the creation of new crimes add to the number of people in prisons?
– What is required in order to shut down prisons?
– How do we transform the judicial system from punitive justice to transformative justice?
– Do we live in a society of containment? We move from one box to another throughout our days.
– How do the people outside of prisons become accountable for the permitted violence inside of the prisons?
– Is the operation of the prison industrial complex a form slavery?
– What are the contradictions in the 13th amendment of the U.S. constitution that permits slavery as punishment for a crime
–  what is prison wage labor?
– How do we make sense of the warehousing of people in prisons?
-What is the harm to families, health and economics in removing people from their respective communities to be place in prisons?
-What is prison abolition?

Left Coast Forum: Opening spaces for dialogue

Topic: Left Coast Forum, community building. Race as social construct, activism
Segment: D Report
Participants: Sharon Kyle, Co-Editor and Publisher, LA Progressive
Broadcast Air Date: 08/24/18
Time: 5:15 PM (PST)
Station: KUCR 88.3 FM Riverside, CA
KUCR station page: http://www.kucr.org
Archive pages: https://soundcloud.com/stoppretending, http://www.dreport.org

Send comments about this segment to: comments@dreport.org

Segment produced in KUCR, the radio station of the University California in Riverside.

Disclaimer: The views expressed are the sole responsibility of the respective speakers and do not represent the endorsed position of the UC Regents, UC Riverside or KUCR.

Discussion Topics:
-What is the Left Coast Forum 2018?
– Were there any surprises from the first Left coast forum in 2017?
-How do we open up spaces of dialogue to be inclusive of everyone?
– What kinds of conversations are shared in the Left Coast Forum?
– Do we need to go to the Ivy League schools to learn about the capitalist system?
-Is the Left Forum in New York different from the Left Coast Forum in Los Angeles?
– Is academic discourse also available outside of Colleges and Universities?
– How do we assess the importance of public space for a healthy society?
– Can we re-appropriate the public space via access of community college settings?
– Where can we openly congregate to have conversations about the important subjects affecting our lives?
– Have you read, City of Inmates: Conquest, Rebellion, and the Rise of Human Caging in Los Angeles, by Kelly Lytle Hernández?
– How is the subject of race central to understanding the Left Coast Forum?
– Is the progressive movement ready to address race critically?
– What is the history of race as a social invention?
– How did bacon’s rebellion lead to the creation of whiteness and non-whiteness?
– How do we overcome the taboo against talking about race?
– Have you read the book ,The Invention of the White Race by Theodore W. Allen?
– How do we become liberated from the racial construct?

Cinema Culturas-Time tell our own stories

08/10/18 Cinema Culturas- Time tell our own stories

Topic: Film,  Culture, Community, Film Festival, Coachella Valley,
Segment: D Report
Participants: Cony Martinez, PhD, General Director Cinema Culturas Foundation
Broadcast Air Date: 08/10/18
Time: 5:15 PM (PST)
Station: KUCR 88.3 FM Riverside, CA
KUCR station page: http://www.kucr.org
Archive pages: https://soundcloud.com/stoppretending, http://www.dreport.org

Send comments about this segment to: comments@dreport.org

Segment produced in KUCR, the radio station of the University California in Riverside.
Disclaimer: The views expressed are the sole responsibility of the respective speakers and do not represent the endorsed position of the UC Regents, UC Riverside or KUCR.

Discussion Topics:
-How do we recognize the power of film?
-Why is it important to make film accessible to the community?
– What is Cinema Culturas?
– How does the community connect and become impacted by the film festival?
-Does everyone in Los Angeles want to be an actor, director or movie producer?
– Does film also express the hierarchy of society?
-Instead of talking about the other, can film allow people to talk for themselves?
– Is your heart in the right place in order to you make things accessible?
-The heart of the film festival is about the stories being told.
-What is the “ other” Coachella?
-How do we exercise the act of being inclusive?
– Why is it important to screen the films in accessibility to the producing community?
-What stories are you filming and where are these stories taking place is just as important as why you decided to film?
-Is the festival in the fields about highlighting our home?
– How do we honor the people that tell their stories?
-What is the difference between sharing someone’s stories and appropriating someone’s stories?
– Do we have ownership of our own stories?
– How do we trust that the inclusive practice is expected to be difficult?
– Can we distinguish the authentic commitment to be inclusive from in-authentic inclusivity?
-How do we embrace language as a barrier to create opportunities to open more doors?
– Is it fair to consider film as a medium that is exclusive and difficult to get into?
-What is the difference between the film industry and the use of film to tell stories a create community?
– Our stories do not have to be told by Hollywood; It is time for us to tell our own stories.
– How do we portray our communities as creative people?
– How do we address the issues of representation as the divide between the stereotypes and the realities that we own?
– How do we take ownership the great creativity available in our homes ?
– Why is it more important to get the story right than getting the filming aspect right?